This week was a productive.
Except for a few earlier stitches, I have caught up with SSS challenge.
The current Beyond TAST challenge is yet to be taken for consideration. Hope it starts next week.
Red and black tunic
The work on this tunic is nearing completion. Red oval stones were stitched onto the yoke. In the picture it is not clear. I am working on the sleeves now.
WIPW193-redblatp-4
Cream tussar tunic
I am in the last phase on this project. After working on peach thread, the final detail is the yellow thread for the flower centre. The sleeves are ready, the work is continuing on the tunic front.
WIPW193-creamtust-11
Two other projects are still in thinking mode.

 

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To understand how the posting this work in progress is helpful, visit Pintangle. I completed last week’s TAST stitch.
The hussif was taken out and kept back, when a mistake was found on the black work filling. It’ll be hard enough to pull out the waste canvas, so the option to rectify the mistake is out, just have to think of something to work over the flaw.
The black yoke was completed with phukari embroidery.

19.wipwednesdays-whgreytunic3

19.wipwednesdays-whgreytunic3

The earlier worked edges were completed on Randje per week challenge.

19.wipwednesdays-rpw 13,14

19.wipwednesdays-rpw 13,14

The yellow tunic with chanderi silk cotton sleeves in its full glory.

19.wipwednesdays-yctunic

19.wipwednesdays-yctunic

Gujarati ethnic embroidery  was drawn for a  cream tunic with  multi coloured striped salwar fabric. The tailor has to mark the place for front and sleeves. The routine of working on the journal was maintained this week.

The progress on stitching during this week on the projects was not much. Still keeping with the flow from the support of Pintangle, The 11th and 12th edges on randje per week challenge was completed.

18.wipwednesdays-rpw11,12

18.wipwednesdays-rpw11,12

The yellow tunic is with the tailor, hoping to get it next week. This tunic is different, because sleeves are woven chanderi silk [a silk variety woven from a region called chanderi in India].
I completed last week’s TAST stitch yesterday.
Moving on to another tunic, this block printed fine cotton fabric with border-

18.wipwednesdays-whgreytunic1

18.wipwednesdays-whgreytunic1

The embroidery chosen for this is geometrical Phulkari work. This ethnic embroidery is from Punjab, India. It is also prevalent in Pakistan , I suppose. The yoke-

18.wipwednesdays-whgrey tunic2

18.wipwednesdays-whgrey tunic2

Along with noting ideas, learning to draw the ideas on the journal before working on a project for the class, some designs for tunics were explored during this week. I am not mentioning the hussif this week.

The yoke and sleeves of this tunic are completed. Small sequins and beads are stitched to the centre of the yoke to give the effect of buttons.
The completed yoke and sleeves-

beige and green tunic-yoke 4

The embroidered pieces are sewn to the tunic. It now looks like this-

beige and green tunicthe closeup- beige&green tunic closeup

Choosing a green colour for the yoke and sleeves would have a been a better choice.But I wanted to try this in brown colour to learn the effect. This yoke pattern leaves some empty space , a crowded pattern could have enhanced the look of the tunic. These are just other options to work with.

The beige thread was first worked for the central pattern on the yoke. Then the same was used for the zigzag pattern on the outline and sleeves.
The details of the embroidery on borders –
The outlines were done in back stitch in green and yellow. The round patterns were done in satin stitch[ fearing the surface satin might alter the small rounds into ablong shapes] in majenta thread. small fly stitches were done in the valley in light green thread.
Now the zigzag pattern was worked in phulkari- surface satin stitch.

beige &green tunic -3 yoke

 

The next post on the completed yoke and tunic.

In this second post, the progress of the phulkari patterns on the brown yoke-
I have done the left over triangles in light green and beige.
The phulkari looks like satin stitch, but it is only surface satin. Geometrical shapes are worked in surface satin stitches. The patterns are spread over a large area, for- bedspreads, cushions, dupattas, tunics, to name a few.
I saw a film’Rab ne banaya jodi’ where the heroine wore fully embroidered phulkari dupattas most of the time, especially during song sequences.
The yoke so far-

beige & green tunic -2 yoke

The beige colour worked on the zigzag border design , on my next post.

This beige fabric is printed with traditional Indian pattern.I loved the colour , print and the combination.

beige&green tunic fabric

Generally I would have chosen a green fabric for yoke , but this time it was brown [with maroon mixed up some where]
Pattern- This was a simple phulkari border used for yoke and sleeves.
Colours- Though beige and green with traces of golden yellow would have been perfect, I found the green did not show well in the brown fabric, I kept the beige, yellow and added majenta to enhance the effect.
I started with some green outlines, worked the circles in majenta, then the some triangles in yellow[ the yellow from the tunic fabric did not go well on this brown too].
the yoke-

B>unic- yoke 1

The progress on the next post.