This week’s randjes were combined with straight stitches. Simple and effective edges. The free graph for these edges are here.

rpw2015-21,22

rpw2015-21,22

The kutchwork borders are simple based on these randjes.

kw-21

kw-21

Single kutchwork squares are worked  along with straight stitches.

kw-22

kw-22

These single kutchwork  squares being very easy to work with, instructions are not necessary.
The pattern-

rpw-kw-21-pattern

rpw-kw-21-pattern

Pattern#22

rpw-kw-22-pattern

rpw-kw-22-pattern

The kutch work border samples which are based on this week’s cross stitch edges on randje per week  2015 challenge are here. the # 19 border has a variation too. The step by step instructions, patterns are also given for these borders.

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This week’s cross stitch edges are interesting to work with. The free graph for these edges are in this blog.

rpw2015-17,18

rpw2015-17,18

These past few weeks, I have been drawing some kutchwork borders based on these edges. This kutchwork embroidery is very common in Indian Gujarati ethnic embroidery. I enjoy trying new ways to design this embroidery work. These days books are available for these. Earlier, the people [tribal] who did these combined with other embroidery stitches filled the whole cloth [wall hangings, box covers, blouses, bed sheets to name a few] continuously, the placement of the patterns depended on creative mind of the worker. Their inspirations were from nature and the works done previously. The kutchwork borders sample pattern inspired by this week’s edges.

rpw2015-kw-17,18-pattern

rpw2015-kw-17,18-pattern

Starting this year with details and patterns of some projects done in the past two years.
This was done in 2012 as part of bridal gifts on my younger nephew’s wedding.
I wanted to a cross stitch border to embellish a pouch, which can be used for various purposes. This was to be a gift for my new niece, Charanya. The fabric was synthetic velvet for the pouch, the cross stitch border was on aida . The pattern was chosen from old antique pattern book and modified.

cross stitch border pattern

cross stitch border pattern

Cotton skeins were used for this work. Alternate crosses were worked for the outline.

cossstbdrc-1

crossstbdrc-1

The second colour

crossstbdrc-2

crossstbdrc-2

Stitches for the centre

crossstbdrc-3

crossstbdrc-3

The next shade

crossstbdrc-4

crossstbdrc-4

The pink thread

crossstbdrc-5

crossstbdrc-5

The lighter pink

crossstbdrc-6

crossstbdrc-6

This border was then embellished with pink stones.

crossstbdrc-7

crossstbdrc-7

The border was then sewn on to the pouch. I enjoyed playing with colours on the old cross stitch border.

I had two dupattas, a plain green in cotton and brown printed in chanderi cotton.

greebrokwyk-tunic fabric

greebrokwyk-tunic fabric

I was not using this green.

greebrokwyk-dupatta

greebrokwyk-dupatta

This piece is a stole and not technically a dupatta. when the green fabric is made into a tunic with a light brown embroidery piece, it might match this brown printed scarf. With this idea a small kutch work design was drawn on graph paper.

greebrkwyk-pattern

greebrkwyk-pattern

The embroidery was done with three colours.

greekwyk-embroidery

greekwyk-embroidery

The tunic after sewn by the tailor-

green brown tunic kutchwork yoke

green brown tunic kutchwork yoke

The tunic with dupatta-

greebrokwyk-tunic with dupatta

greebrokwyk-tunic with dupatta

With this lovely tunic, I need a salwar to go with this set, How about it?

I wanted a yoke pattern made of woven kutchwork motif and borders. I had this hand woven dupatta [scarf] in purple with checked pattern. The tunic with which it was matched was long gone.
Actually I took pictures while working the different motifs, but the size of the motifs were too small, that the weaving and interlacing wouldn’t have been very clear. But if any of the motifs were found interesting, I can share the details. All the motifs and the borders were worked with woven kutchwork.
The tunic

purple tunic woven kutchwork-tunic

purple tunic woven kutchwork-tunic

The detail of the yoke, I added some light colour wooden beads for embellishments, they were not necessary.

purple tunic woven kutch- pattern

purple tunic woven kutch- pattern

The yoke pattern on graph.

purple tunic woven kutch-pattern

purple tunic woven kutch-pattern

The chikan work embroidery is common in Indian state of Uttarpradesh. The embroidery is predominantly shadow work, but other stitches are also used. The chikan work is done on sarees, tunics, salwar suits, dupattas … .Pastel colours and white fabrics in soft cotton, chiffon, silk, crepe are commonly used for this work.
I wanted to explore some simple stitches in chikan work on this tunic. The fabric was light blue soft cotton. Pistil stitch was the main stitch, other stitches were-back stitch, herringbone filling [shadow work], berry stitch.

blue green chikan work tunic

blue green chikan work tunic

The colours were a shade of green I think it is called teal, but I am not sure. The centre detail-

blue green chikan work tunic-=centre

blue green chikan work tunic-=centre

The tailor marked the front for me to trace the pattern. This tunic has a high neck design

blue green chikan work tunic-neck

blue green chikan work tunic-neck

The motif details-

blue green chikan work tunic-  motif detail

blue green chikan work tunic- motif detail

The motif pattern, this can be used as a single motif too.

blue green chikan work tunic- motif

blue green chikan work tunic- motif

The full embroidery pattern

blue green chikan work tunic- pattern

blue green chikan work tunic- pattern

The shop bought chikan work tunic has more embroidery, but I preferred this minimal work. Earlier I had done this chikan work on tunics they are here

I am posting this border pattern which I had designed for sleeves of a blouse the details of which are here..

I don’t seem to find the original drawing. This is basic border which was repeated for the required length.

lagartera border pattern

lagartera border pattern

The continuous borders can be used for kasauti embroidery also.

I had seen some tunics with all over embroidery or print on the yoke and the sleeves. This idea of designing big yoke and sleeves was there for quite some time. When I found this lemon yellow linen fabric, the first thought was the number of colours which can be used on this. Then the idea of working a big yoke and sleeves came from that. Using many colours had its own appeal.
The pattern was combination of wide borders. For this I took the inspiration from both African and Indian ethnic designs. I used three strands of cotton skeins to embroider these bold border patterns.
Copying this design on to the fabric was not easy. For the yoke alone I had to use four carbon papers. The base colour being lemon yellow, using white carbon was not an option. I used red and green carbon, which left blotches of colour all over the fabric.
for this kind of tracing the best option is the method used by commercial embroiderers.
Another option is, use a glass table top, place the pattern on it, position the fabric over the pattern, have a light bulb underneath the table, start drawing with a water soluble pen. Choose the colour appropriate for the fabric. this option works good for linen.
I ‘ll start with the details of the embroidery from the next post.

I was learning tatting, and tried some edgings
Then came an idea of doing the edging on a square cloth.
why not do a motif on that cloth?
Why not do a cross stitch pattern on that cloth/
With these in mind, I designed and worked a cross stitch pattern on Cream Aida cloth.
After completing the embroidery, the edging was tatted as per plan.
The doily-

cross stitch doily with tatted edging

I actually tried two more, but only this edging came out properly[?]