The Y stitch sampler on SSS challenge was completed on Saturday. This week is revision of last five stitches. The stitches on TAST challenge were worked earlier.
The cream yoke needed some lavender elements on it. They were worked this week. The details will be on a separate post.
Before starting with zardosi embroidery on this pink silk/cotton fabric, some outlines have to be worked with threads. This week, it is chain stitch with antique violet colour skein.
WIPW137-msilkzardosi-3
After working the border pattern with herringbone filling, a small kutchwork motif with sharp edges was worked with the same blue thread on this cream fabric.
WIPW137-blublot-kutch-3
This week will be spent on the progress of these two projects, the work on benarsi georgette neckline will resume after this.

I have been in India for the past few weeks. I could stay here till first week of May. Generally stitching comes to a standstill on a vacation. Browsing the net is minimal. This routine is not working now. Too much laziness is also not good. I might forget everything.
It is hard to work the stitch challenges. They are put on hold.
I have two sewn tunics to be embroidered. The first tunic is mangalagiri with chanderi silk cotton patch.
WIPW126-oryelkutcht-1
I had drawn a kutch work design is Muscat for this. The embroidery on this tunic was started.
WIPW126-oryelkutcht-2
The second tunic in white mull fabric on which mirrorwork needs to be done on the black borders.
wipw126-whblamullmirt-1
My neighbour is sewing a blouse for her sister. She wanted a simple embroidery on it. We have bought some red and white stones for embellishing. The fabric needs to be marked.
WIPW126-peachb-1
These information posted here is for motivating me to start doing some embroidery work.

This week’s progress has been mediocre.

The RPW2016 challenge took more time than was expected. The completed chart.

WIPW101-RPW-W33

WIPW101-RPW-W33

I am going to Chennai, India tomorrow for two weeks. For the past few times these trips have been stitch free. Hoping for some embroidery productive days.
Marash embroidery/ kutchwork embroidery
Kutchwork Cream tunic with kalamkari patch
The tunic fabric was marked for neck and sleeves by the tailor. The pattern was drawn on the sleeves first. In this transfer also, the fabric to be marked is placed over the design and the pattern is drawn with a pencil. The kutchwork/ interlacing stitch/ marash embroidery commenced with the brown thread. Same colour as the brown fabric.

WIPW101-cralamkaripatkutch-7

WIPW101-cralamkaripatkutch-7

Orange violet combo tunic
The impact of working this kutchwork, the multi colour mirror work on white and blue combo tunic and seeing a kasuti embroidery design – all gave rise to another idea of working kutchwork embroidery in four colours on an orange and violet tunic. I am still in the process of drawing the pattern. The embroidery will be three places- the sleeves, below the neck and a big design on the right hand side of the tunic. I may have more details after the designs are completed.

WIPW101-oraviocombokutch-1

WIPW101-oraviocombokutch-1

Mirror work

white and blue combo tunic

The mirror work around the neck and sleeves on this blue white combo tunic was completed.

beige mirror work tunic
After working the sleeves with brown thread, I proceeded with the work on tunic front. The spaces inside the squares will have the mirrors.

WIPW101-beigemirt-3

WIPW101-beigemirt-3

Kantha embroidery
The kantha embroidery is drawn and ready to be transferred. With the packing in progress for the trip, If time permits, the tracing can be made on the plain black fabric to be worked in Chennai. Will have to wait and see.

WIPW101-marblaikatkantha-2

WIPW101-marblaikatkantha-2

This is the latest tunic where blue is matched with yellow and orange. In Muscat, Oman, we get oxidized silver accessories. Most of them have beads on them. Different shades of corals are available and they are coordinated with turquoise beads. These are feast for eyes in the souq. Mind slowly started generating patterns for projects built on these inspirations.
This tunic started with the yellow fabric printed with orange motifs. A kutchwork design with allowance for mirrors was drawn along with two other embroidery designs. The choice was to work the embroidery on yellow fabric or orange fabric. With the orange fabric being available yellow was the first colour chosen. The next choice was green. The fly stitches on the leaf pattern.

yelorbluet-1

yelorbluet-1

Two kutchwork motifs were worked in orange thread which was lighter than the fabric colour.

yelorbluet-2

yelorbluet-2

Another motif pattern had an option of being worked in two threads, the central diamond are worked in maroon thread.

yelorbluet-3

yelorbluet-3

Starting with the idea of incorporating blue into this design, the corners of this square motif was worked in blue thread.

yelorbluet-4

yelorbluet-4

The yellow from the fabric was the next colour, the same motif pattern which was worked in lighter orange was now worked in yellow thread.

yelorbluet-5

yelorbluet-5

The fly stitches are outlined with buttonhole stitch in lighter green thread.

yelorbluet-6

yelorbluet-6

Open chain stitches are worked in white thread to outline the mirrors inside the orange and yellow kutchwork motifs. The piece itself was outlined with back stitch.

yelorbluet-7

yelorbluet-7

Mirrors were worked in the same fabric yellow in the space between the leaf patterns.

yelorbluet-8

yelorbluet-8

Square mirrors in blue thread are worked inside the square motifs.

yelorbluet-9

yelorbluet-9

These blue beads are made of wood and dyed in blue.

yelorbluet-10

yelorbluet-10

The blue handloom cotton fabric with stripes was perfect for this set.

yellow orange patialablue tunic

yellow orange patialablue tunic

Outlining the embroidered piece and the sleeves with the yellow orange fabric was a good choice. Though this idea was mine, I could see the satisfaction in my tailor’s eyes. He is quite stingy with praises.

yeloow orange Patiala blue unic-det

yeloow orange Patiala blue unic-det

The pattern for this embroidery-

yelorbluet-pattern

yelorbluet-pattern

Kutch work embroidery fascinates me. Sometimes it is a motif, or a woven design, or a border. The differences in working each piece is quite absorbing. This is the reason, every now and then, a kutchwork project keeps showing on my posts. This time, an idea of a small kutchwork design worked in different colours came to mind.
This design can be worked as woven kutch work too.
The pattern, as a usual practice the mirrors are also incorporated in this pattern.

blmultiy-pat

blmultiy-pat

The design was drawn on a blue fabric. The embroidery started with choosing these threads. Few more threads were added while working. The kutchwork was worked in three strands of stranded cotton

blmultiy-threads

blmultiy-threads

After working a corner design, started with the repeating design.

blmultiy-1

blmultiy-1

The working was faster than I expected. The thread consumption  for each piece was also very less.

blmultiy-2

blmultiy-2

This particular kutchwork motif can be also be weaved, instead of interlacing. The interlacing leaves space in between the interlaced squares.

blmultiy-3

blmultiy-3

The yellow and orange threads were alternated with a touch of pink, green and blue in between them. The colourful kutchwork embroidery.

blmultiy-4

blmultiy-4

The outline in chain stitch with blue thread.

blmultiy-5

blmultiy-5

The chain stitches in white are worked after this.

blmultiy-6

blmultiy-6

The small square mirrors worked with blue thread.

blmultiy-7

blmultiy-7

Three yoke patterns were engineered one after another a while ago. This is the first piece. After completing this embroidery, the tunic for which this was intended, a blue cotton fabric, was not appealing enough. So yesterday, another tunic fabric was picked for this piece.

blue multi col yoke white tunic

blue multi col yoke white tunic

This is ready to go to the tailor.

This is the last past of the series in hand embroidery on wearable. In this post we’ll consider some ideas of designing embroidery on tunics which are marked for necklines and sleeves. By this method it is possible to work any type of embroidery of our choice on wearable. Ready to wear tunics are made this way on large scale.
The fabrics are marked for necklines, sleeves, slits, shoulders, borders. The chosen embroidery designs are transferred on to the fabrics. These fabrics are secured on big rectangular embroidery frames. The embroidery is done by embroiderers trained for this. After the embroidery is completed, the fabrics are taken away from the frames and sewn by tailors.
But we can do it on a small scale. After choosing the embroidery design, we can ask the tailor [or if a person is good tailor, then help themselves] to mark the places on the fabric to work the embroidery. Using these markings as guidelines, we can transfer the pattern on the fabrics. After completing the embroidery, the fabrics can be sewn into tunics, blouses, shirts… as the case may be.
Here are few samples of embroidered tunics, which were marked, embroidered and sewn into tunics.
This mangalagiri cotton tunic with stripes was marked with neckline. This was in early days when I was trying this idea. Though it was marked, the pattern chosen for this kutchwork embroidery was set apart from the actual neck line. After embroidering on the pattern, I added some small kutchwork motifs below the neck.

eowet-09

eowet-09

The shirt fabric is linen and the idea was to work white work on this. The markings were made according to the pattern, which was to be worked on both sides in the front. Crochet edging was worked later on the sleeve. This embroidery was a tough project, linen fabric did not help.

eowet-10

eowet-10

This yellow tunic is cotton. The pattern was transferred on to the front, where a marking was made for the neck. White and yellow carbons were ruled out on this colour. Green carbon paper was used to transfer the pattern. The marking is still on the neck to show the difference between the neck line on pattern and the actual neckline!

eowet-11

eowet-11

This mangalagiri cotton tunic has kantha embroidery on it. The tailor had marked a simple round neck. The pattern transfer and embroidery were worked on front and sleeves based on that. Seeing the work, he changed the neckline to this beautiful one. Sometimes it is better to leave some small space around the neck, to facilitate these kind of surprises. There is also a possibility of the tailor cutting off a small part of embroidery during his course of work.

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eowet-12

The pattern for this kutchwork embroidery was drawn with this neck design. It was transferred on to the marked fabric. This tunic sample is a proof of a good coordination of pattern neckline and the tunic neckline.

eowet-13

eowet-13

The embroidery design for this cotton mangalagiri tunic was picked from a salwar design magazine. The tailor had this magazine with him. When I wanted to do this project, he not only marked but also explained where each and every element should be placed. Based on the inspiration and the guidance, this pattern was drawn and embroidered. Around the neck I had to draw the elements by hand to get the same effect. Still it was worth it. This embroidery has surface satin stitch on it.

eowet-14

eowet-14

Each and every design on these samples was chosen for that particular tunic in mind and they were all worked with the help of the markings made by the tailor.
We can work any embroidery on the tunic fabric in this manner. Important thing to note is to check whether the fabric is suitable for that embroidery. It is not just designing the embroidery, the tunic style is also kept in mind. It is a very interesting work. Practice, perseverance, eye for colours, basic calculations and understanding of fabrics and embroidery are the tools.
Enjoy designing and embroidering on wearable.

In this part of the series we will see the possibilities of working embroidery on sewn tunics. We all have some plain tunics either sewn by a tailor or bought from the shop. These tunics inspire us to work some simple embroidery to enhance the look. Big shops have same tunics in different sizes, how to make them unique? is the question. Sometimes printed salwars or patialas or leggings, jeans help us to jazz up a plain tunic. The necklines, the sleeves and the style are already there. The first thing to choose is the embroidery itself. The options are- our embroidery skill and use of mirrors or beads or stones. There are embellished pieces available in the market. These pieces can be glued or sewn or appliqued on to the tunic fabric. Now moving on to the colour choices. Generally colours are chosen with tunic in mind or are based on the salwar or leggings. Sometimes a colour in our mind also brings about a project. Tracing the design. This is the trickiest part in embroidering on sewn tunics. A well sewn tunic may look odd with wrongly placed design. It is hard to erase the mistakes of the copied design. Ensure the design is placed at the right place before tracing. Some tips- Please work at one sitting, instead of moving away for some other purpose. Use a steady hand. Stabilize the pattern with pins. Lift and check at different points before tracing. If there are pleats, seams on the tunics, ensure the pattern papers placed properly and careful in drawing over and around them. These are the vulnerable places, where if the pressure applied is more it may cause tearing of the pattern. Place the tunic on a flat surface. Spread it well. Be careful while securing with pins. Pierce with the pin the paper and the tunic together. Smoothen the surface of creases after the pins are all in place. Check often to see the placement is as perfect as possible. This part is not to be done when we are tired. Tracing any pattern on to the fabric is tedious. There is another option. When we want to stitch mirrors, beads on to the fabric, we can mark the points with the help of scale. Small lines and curves can be drawn with the help of pencil and scale if we have a steady hand. Now let see some samples of embroidery on sewn tunics. This tunic has a kutchwork motif element which is repeated to make a border. The single motif element is extended a little and used for the centre. The border was traced without much difficulty with the use of .the lines on this checked cotton mangalagiri tunic. The centre was folded and midpoint of the design was placed on it before securing with pins.

eowet-1

eowet-1

This tunic fabric is Kanchi cotton. The border on the fabric was horizontally sewn in front. The centre was folded and the midpoint of this kutchwork design was placed over it before it was traced. The border was too plain, some line stitches are worked on them and around the neck.

eowet-2

eowet-2

This design with the square especially for this neck was traced in the centre on this cotton tunic.

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eowet-3

The tunic fabric is tussar. It was sewn with lining. The embroidery was worked with single strand of anchor cotton. To fill inside the design space with running stitches, the lines on the fabric were used.

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eowet-4

Here are some samples were the markings are made with the help of ruler. In this border, points are marked with the help of pencil and ruler. Fly stitch variation is worked on those marked points in black thread. Mirrors and beads can be worked in this manner.

eowet-5

eowet-5

This cotton tunic  in maroon colour was sewn with these borders in the front. The sleeves were made in cotton ikat fabric. After copying the motif below these borders, the markings for the mirrors, kutchwork squares were made with the help of ruler. The individual kutchwork elements were drawn by hand.

eowet-6

eowet-6

In this tunic, the sleeves, the border and the fabric below the neck were all sewn by the tailor. The paisleys on the printed yoke was highlighted with white thread. The space around the fabric was quite thick, it would have been hard to work the embroidery on it. Using the outline, the kutchwork elements were drawn at equal intervals around it. Gold sequins and beads were added as embellishments.

eowet-7

eowet-7

This linen tunic was sewn with tiny pleats in front. Markings were made with the ruler for the flowers, the stems were drawn around it.

eowet-8

eowet-8

It was difficult to use the embroidery hoop on these four tunics, so I did not use it. These samples are shown here to explain some ideas on embroidery on tunics. The samples used are my own. Use this as a reference and move ahead and work to create your own beautiful tunics. The last post on this series will be embroidery on tunic part two, where the tailor cooperates and marks the neck, sleeves for embroidery.