The second part of the cream mirror work yoke starts with the cream tunic being short. It was not matching well with the striped salwar because of the length. An idea of attaching another fabric was considered and rejected. The new fabric might clash with the salwar again. So a decision was made to keep this tunic aside and a lavender colour fabric which will go well with the striped salwar was chosen on the last visit to India. The lavender fabric needed some embroidery. While browsing through the wardrobe, it seemed like a good idea to stitch this cream mirror work on to this lavender fabric. Tailor did a nice job of taking out the embroidered pieces and stitched them on to this lavender tunic. The gold beads had to go.
The sleeves on lavender tunic.
lavmirt-sleeves
The tunic with cream mirror work attached to the front.
lavender mirrorwork tunic

lavmirt
Now this piece does not have enough lavender elements. I started with working chain stitch in variegated silk thread inside the curves.
lavmirt-1
There was some unworked space near the shoulder. The embroidery was extended to cover the space. It was helpful to have a record of the thread colours worked earlier.
lavmirt-2
After working chain stitch with variegated thread, a line of stem stitch and up and down buttonhole stitch combination was worked beside the orange outline in antique violet thread.
lavmirt-3
To reduce the cream colour on fabric and enhance the lavender colour, small triangles were worked with herringbone filling.
lavmirt-4a
The yoke after working these triangles.
lavmirt-4b
The same idea of triangles worked in herringbone filling was extended to neck border too.
lavmirt-5
The completed yoke.
cream mirror work on lavender tunic
The tunic set is ready to wear now.

The story of this yoke starts with this striped cotton fabric.
cremirt-salwar
Thinking all these colours can be used for embroidery on a cream base, a cream cotton fabric was chosen for the tunic. This cream mangalagiri handloom cotton fabric was given to the tailor for marking the front and sleeves.

And  a simple border design was embroidered on the sleeves.
cremirt-sleeves
The pattern for the same.
cremirt-pats
The embroidery for this mirror work started with green colour skein. The mirror outlines were worked n chain stitch, the curls were worked in stem stitch and the leaves in leaf stitch.
cremirt-1
The second stage was to work the orange colour skein. Chain stitches and buttonhole stitches were worked with this thread.
cremirt-2
Next in line was the antique violet colour skein. The triangles around the neck were worked in buttonhole stitches and the second mirror outlines were worked in chain stitch.
cremirt-3
The last outline around mirrors were worked in polyester gold colour thread.
cremirt-4
The diamond shaped mirrors were outlined with variegated polyester thread.
cremirt-5
The remaining chain stitch outlines were worked in yellow colour skein.
cremirt-6
The same yellow skein was used for working all the mirrors.
cremirt-7
Oval shaped gold bead was the last detail to be worked on this embroidery.
cremirt-8
The pattern for this yoke.
cremirt-paty
The completed tunic.
cream mirror work tunic
This was the story of this tunic in 2014. After two and a half years, the same yoke became a part of another tunic. Which will be narrated later.

The week’s work was quite slow. The herringbone filling with dark aqua green thread [anchor-189] on the borders was completed. More filling stitches with other colours are to be started. It takes long because, for each and every square the working thread has to be cut and restarted again.

WIPW63-blugreenpatiala3

WIPW63-blugreenpatiala3

This week’s randjes are large. My third sampler cloth couldn’t accommodate both borders. The second one has to be started on another cloth. The sampler looks-

WIPW63-RPW

WIPW63-RPW

Yesterday Navrathri festival started. This is festival which is celebrated for nine days. Clay figurines depict the various Gods and significant mythological scenes are kept on display. I have done this every year, when I lived in India. Many rituals are also performed glorifying the female Gods. Women are invited. I need to go for a visit. Our traditional saree is the dress code. I bought this cotton kota saree designed by Arundati Menon. I had to attach falls [a five inch strip of fabric which is attached to the saree border, where it touches the ground, to protect the saree] on this saree. After working the second randje, the embroidery on the borders will resume.

WIPW63-kota saree

WIPW63-kota saree