A very interesting name for an embroidery stitch. I am just spelling it, it is hard to pronounce, I think it is French. It is also referred as bull’s head stitch. We are doing one version of this stitch which does not look like bull’s head but more like flower head. The working of the stitch is on Queenie’s blog.
Queenie has also given the other version along with her home work. I’ll work the other version some other time.

I started the sampler with the different variations given on Queenie’s blog. It was easier to copy and work them without thinking too much.
.
SSS.20. tdboeuf-1
In the first row the stitches were worked in various heights without leaving space in between. In the second row this stitch are worked horizontal. It was hard to work them continuously as linear stitch in this row, so another version of the stitch was tried to start the chain stitch without leaving space. The stitches were worked individually in the third row. The stitches are worked back to back in two colours in the last row.
SSS.20.tdboeuf-2
Some options of arranging this stitch in different ways are experimented in this part of the sampler.
SSS.20.tdboeuf-3
A easy stitch to work. I also saw the other version which is also equally interesting. The whole sampler-

SSS.20.tete-de-boeuf sampler

This week’s stitch on SSS challenge is satin outline stitch. The working is on Queenie’s bog.
Patience is required to work this stitch neatly or at least evenly. With tired eyes and restlessness, that quality was absent. There is just a satisfaction of working this stitch.
I tried this stitch on matti cloth first.
SSS.19.satolinest-1
Thinking it might turn out better on plain sampler cloth. The first row is worked on four strands of cotton skein for split stitch, and the same thread is used for reinforcement and the satin stitches are worked in perle cotton#8. The second row also the threads are used in the same way, except while starting the satin stitch I did not stitch through the cloth, just went under the running stitches, the satin stitches are too mobile. Seeing it is not working, continued with inserting through the cloth. The thread used in this row is 6 strands of cotton skein. The curved third row is worked with satin outline stitch in six strands of cotton skein and completed with stem stitch in perle cotton. The last one is trying this stitch on a spiral design.
SSS.19.Satin outline stitch
As mentioned earlier, it requires patience. I may have to try this stitch some other time, with more light.

I am still in India. While working on the kutchwork design on orange and yellow tunic, this Q stitch came on SSS challenge. Feeling this stitch would be easy to try, I jumped over two previous stitches and started this stitch sampler. The working of the stitch is here on Queenie’s blog.
I started with the stitch looking like ‘Q’s. being the stitch name. In the second sample the chain stitch horizontal and the stitch extended upwards. The third row samples are V- shaped Q stitches, not a successful effort. The chain stitches twisted.
SSS.17.Q st-1
The extensions of the chain stitches are long and short alternatively on the first row. The chain stitch themselves are long and short alternatively in the second row. The third row is an attempt of Q stitch worked on twisted chain.
SSS.17.Q st-2
In the first row when I worked the chain stitches in an angle, the extensions were worked horizontal. This helped the chain stitches to behave. Double rows of Q stitches are worked in the next two samples. And chain stitch extensions are on both sides. The same idea of working the extensions on both sides is carried over and worked alternatively in the last sample.
SSS.17.Q st-3
The completed sampler.
SSS.17.Q stitch samplerhere
It is an easy stitch to work. Can also be used as decorative stitch with other stitches.

This week’s stitch on SSS challenge is lace stitch or three sided stitch. This stitch comes under pulled thread embroidery. The working is on Queenie’s blog. Earlier in this challenge we had four sided stitch. The samples of four sided stitch were worked as any counted thread stitch and not as pulled thread work. Needing to expand my skill, I have decided to work this stitch as pulled thread work.
Started to learn this stitch on mati cloth. The fabric is far more accommodative than I expected.
12-lace3sidst-s1
Then tried the stitch on a linen bought from IKEA. This is not the effect I want.
12-lace3sidst-s2
Mati cloth it is.
An idea to work the samples along with some borders seems like a good one at this point. Maybe it is better to work within a specified area. Then what about looking for some frames which can be used for this?
The frame
12lace3sidst-frame
Measured the area to be worked and started with the first sample.
12-lace3sidst-1
The pattern for this. It is the basic three sided stitch. The black dots are were the fabric is pulled and create holes.
12-lace3sidst-1pat
Two rows of three sided stitch worked together looks like this-
12-lace3sidst-2
The pattern
12-lace3sidst-2pat
The idea for this sample occurred while learning the stitch on matti cloth.
12-lace3sidst-3
The pattern. Each hexagon need not be connected. That’ll make another variation.
12-lace3sidst-3pat
Three sided stitch worked on both sides of this black work pattern.
12-lace3sidst-4
The pattern
12-lace3sidst-4pat
These squares are not connected.
12-lace3sidst-5
The pattern
12-lace3sidst-5pat
The stitches are worked diagonally.

12-lace3sidst-6
The pattern
12-lace3sidst-6pat
The sampler is completed. A picture of the sampler was also taken. It was not easy to insert the sampler inside the frame. The problem was not foreseen. After uploading the images, noticed that the sampler image was blurred. I did not want to take it out and insert it again. The framed sampler-
12-lace-or-3-sided-stitch-sampler
It was very exciting to work on this sampler. I had tried pulled thread work when working on sumptuous surfaces class. But three sided stitch was tried for the first time on this challenge.
The matti cloth cooperated well.
The stitch itself is versatile.
I could work on another Stitch A Long in this project which was not happening for quite some time.
It was interesting learning process to fit the sampler within  the frame.
I could complete the work.

It was a good pastime to see designed stitch samplers on the net. Even though this is small piece I am happy to do this.

Interlaced running stitch is this week’s stitch study on Queenie’s Sunday stitch school challenge. The working is there on her blog.
TAST challenge has been running for ten years now. Running stitch was explored twice on it. First time the running stitch samples were simple and some samples  were taken after the idea of pattern darning. Second time around the running stitches were used on Kantha embroidery. Interlacing did not feature both times. I had bought this book some time ago, which had some options and project for interlaced and whipped running stitches. And Queenie was kind enough to include this stitch on SSS challenge.
sss-intrunst-bk
The explorations
The sampler started with simple interlaced running stitch and a row of simple whipped running stitch[ the decision to whip the running stitches just came on its own!] the rest of the samples are variations of interlaced running stitches.
sss-9-intrunst-1
After working the running stitches in rows, this part of the sampler has running stitches worked to handle interlacing in different ways.
sss-9-intrunst-2
In the first sample the running [?] stitches are worked vertically. The next two rows are interlaced and whipped running stitch combination.
sss-9-intrunst-3
These samples are worked following the book mentioned above.
sss-intrunst-4
With these samples this sampler was completed.

sss-9-interlaced-running-stitch-sampler

After a few weeks break I am back on track with this stitch challenge. This stitch challenge is posted by Queenie on her blog. These stitches are stitches which are simple [till now] and did not feature in TAST challenges. The working of four sided stitch is here. This is a counted thread stitch but can also be worked on plain fabric with some practice. A nice variation from cross stitch.
This sampler started with the four sided stitches are worked over 3 holes, four holes, five holes and two holes, in that order. The sample worked over two holes is stitched with anchor cotton skein. Rest of the samples are worked in polyester thread.

SSS.6.fosist-1

SSS.6.fosist-1

Trying to familiarize with the stitch-
I changed the direction of the stitch in the first sample, worked individual stitches in the second sample, an up and down version in the third sample and the diagonal version worked horizontal in the fourth sample.

SSS.6.fosist-2

SSS.6.fosist-2

Since it is called four sided stitch and not square stitch, it became obligatory to work this stitch- as rectangles in first sample, angling the stitches to the left in the second sample and ablong diamonds in the third sample. After working these samples, fearing, working in this direction might lead to black work patterns and stopped right there.

SSS.6.fosist-3

SSS.6.fosist-3

Two versions of four sided stitches are worked together in these samples.
The four sided stitch worked over four holes is combined with four sided stitch worked over three holes in the first sample. Individual four sided stitches are worked inside four sided stitch worked over five holes in the second sample. Diagonal four sided stitches and basic four sided stitches are alternatively worked in the third sample. Individual stitches are worked inside alternative diagonal four sided stitches in the fourth sample.

SSS.6.fosist-4

SSS.6.fosist-4

Now for some stitch combinations.
Four sided stitch row worked with running stitch rows in the first sample. Double cross stitches are combined with this stitch in the second row [other isolated stitches can also be tried in this manner]. After working single long straight stitches in between these four sided stitches, sheaf stitches are used to tie and link them together in the third sample. It started with the idea of combining buttonhole stitches with four sided stitches in the fourth row, but ended up with combining cretan stitches. In the last sample, Danish knots, detached chain stitches and individual fly stitches are worked on four sided stitch row.

SSS.6.fosist-5

SSS.6.fosist-5

This after noon we went to the park [where we take a walk in the evenings] and sat on a bench. This was our view.

SSS.6.fosist-view

SSS.6.fosist-view

The stitch combinations were started at home and completed sitting on the bench. Time well spent. Very enjoyable hour. It is pleasantly cool in Muscat now.
The completed sampler-

SSS.6.fou sided stitch sampler

SSS.6.fou sided stitch sampler

This week’s stitch on Sunday Stitch School is Ermine stitch. The working is on Queenie’s blog. I have come across this so many times on embroidery stitch books and always thought this has to be tried one day, which never came till now. A very simple stitch, can also be cross stitch with three stitches
This stitch is worked with two strands of perle cotton [I think] on queenie’s blog. Continuing with that- the first row is the basic ermine stitch. The straight stitch in the centre is worked with another thread in the second row. In the third row the individual stitches are worked continuously to make this a linear stitch.

SSS.5.ermst-1

SSS.5.ermst-1

In these three rows the height of the three stitches are varied and explored.

SSS.5.ermst-2

SSS.5.ermst-2

In this part of the sampler, two ermine stitches are worked together-
the ermine stitch and its mirror image are worked in a line in the first sample. A long straight stitch is made in the second row, and two ermine stitches are worked one below the other. The ermine stitches are worked in opposite directions in the third row. The fourth row is the long and short version of the ermine stitches worked alternatively and this row should have been in the second part of the sampler, the idea came later. Two ermine stitches worked in opposite directions in the fifth row. The ermine stitch and its opposite version in another thread is worked beside it. the same treatment is continued on the last row.

SSS.5.ermst-3

SSS.5.ermst-3

Since this stitch is formed of a straight stitch and two crossed stitches, an idea of working these crosses over other stitches which have straight stitches. The four stitches chosen are –
Cretan stitch in the first row, buttonhole variation in the second row, pistil and long tailed detached chain in the third row.

SSS.5.ermst-4a

SSS.5.ermst-4a

The ermine stitches worked over them

SSS.5.ermst-4b

SSS.5.ermst-4b

I enjoyed working on this stitch sampler. The stitch gives room for many possibilities. Sometimes it can be used for filling wide spaces, creating shapes, securing long straight stitches, sometimes as a couching stitch too. After working on this stitch for some time, a rhythm is achieved, which can be used for working on plain fabric.

SSS.5.ermine stitch sampler

SSS.5.ermine stitch sampler