neck pattern


Stitch challenges
By starting the SSS challenge stitch early, I had time work more stitch combinations on the sampler.
The TAST stitch was worked on earlier challenge, just posting the link on FB group was the only thing to do.
Projects
Last year I had seen a half white tunic on pinterest. The is tunic had geometric borders around the neck
and front in black. It was hard to determine whether the design was printed or embroidered. An idea to
convert the borders into kutchwork designs was on mind. Found that, it is easier to convert the borders
to kutchwork design, but drawing them on paper is taking a long time. After the designing part is
completed, this pattern has to be traced on cream colour cotton fabric and after that the embroidery
work will begin. Seems like a long and tedious project, still having waited this long to start on the idea, it
is better not to postpone it any further.
A block printed fabric was bought some years ago. When it was matched with a dark green fabric and small patch of mirror work, my previous tailor made this block printed fabric into a salwar[ Indian pants],  and the dark green fabric into a tunic. The dark green fabric was thick , synthetic  fabric and was not comfortable to wear and it was disregarded after some time.
WIPW140-green mir
This printed fabric underwent another change of trying match with a brown/pink fabric with medium size embroidery. At that time it seemed a like a good idea to work the embroidery in light colours, but the fabric which had grains on it was not showing the embroidery properly. I don’t seem to have the picture of the tunic. This was also disregarded at a later date and the printed salwar was hiding in the closet. This time on my Chennai trip, I decided to play safe by buying a plain green fabric. This was given to the tailor last week.
WIPW140-pargreepinktmir-1
A simple embroidery has to be worked in between the pleats and five mirrors have to stitched on the neck. Planning to start the work tomorrow. A simple embroidery is required at this time.
I moved on to lighter green thread on this pink silk cotton fabric for the violet matka silk tunic. the stitch is leaf stitch.

WIPW140-silkzardosi-5

Advertisements

I have been working on this sewn tunic this week.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht
The kutchwork pattern was traced onto the tunic with white carbon. Not a very bright idea.
The pattern-
WIPW127.oryelkutcht-pat
When a time was conducive I started with brown thread. The design was very light after so many weeks. The brown thread in Chennai sunlight did not match so well as in Muscat indoor light. Still eager to start the project, I started with the basic stitches with brown thread. While working on it bought red and yellow threads. After ensuring the points are covered with brown thread, started with the yellow thread.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht-1
The basic stitches in brown are interlaced with red thread. This looks much better than the dull brown. Controlling the urge to work mirrors.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht-2
The four motifs below the neck was worked in red thread.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht-3
The pattern is now is worked with yellow thread.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht-4
The centre and other spaces are worked in half white thread. By this time the design from white carbon has completely vanished. This pattern was also drawn on 2mm graph paper.
WIPW127-oryelkutcht-5
The project is completed without mirrors.
WIPW127-orange yellow chanderi kutch tunic
The embroidery detail-
WIPW127-orange yellow kutch tunic-det
The tunic looks nice even without the embroidery. An outline stitch around the neck would have been sufficient.
The 17th stitch on SSS challenge seems like an easy stitch. Started working on the sampler today.

Stitch challenges
SSS
The band sampler of last week’s lace stitch along with a few NESSAL black work borders was completed. This week’s stitch is mount mellick stitch. I have not worked this stitch before. I have always wanted to learn other embroidery techniques. This mount mellick embroidery is one of them. Taking the opportunity given by this challenge, an idea of working a sampler of some stitches of this embroidery along with this week’s stitch as come up. The shapes are drawn on paper and traced on a beige fabric. Hoping to start the work tomorrow.
TAST
This week’s stitch is a beautiful stitch with a long name- buttonholed cable chain stitch. The samples were worked on earlier challenge. The link was posted on FB group page yesterday.
I have started the embroidery with gold metallic thread on this green fabric.
wipw125-benagreen-zardosi-2
I am going to India for a whole month on this Saturday. Four weeks is too long to be without stitching. Just sorting through the projects to take at least two of them to India. Really hoping not to buy tunic fabrics for embroidery.

This is the last past of the series in hand embroidery on wearable. In this post we’ll consider some ideas of designing embroidery on tunics which are marked for necklines and sleeves. By this method it is possible to work any type of embroidery of our choice on wearable. Ready to wear tunics are made this way on large scale.
The fabrics are marked for necklines, sleeves, slits, shoulders, borders. The chosen embroidery designs are transferred on to the fabrics. These fabrics are secured on big rectangular embroidery frames. The embroidery is done by embroiderers trained for this. After the embroidery is completed, the fabrics are taken away from the frames and sewn by tailors.
But we can do it on a small scale. After choosing the embroidery design, we can ask the tailor [or if a person is good tailor, then help themselves] to mark the places on the fabric to work the embroidery. Using these markings as guidelines, we can transfer the pattern on the fabrics. After completing the embroidery, the fabrics can be sewn into tunics, blouses, shirts… as the case may be.
Here are few samples of embroidered tunics, which were marked, embroidered and sewn into tunics.
This mangalagiri cotton tunic with stripes was marked with neckline. This was in early days when I was trying this idea. Though it was marked, the pattern chosen for this kutchwork embroidery was set apart from the actual neck line. After embroidering on the pattern, I added some small kutchwork motifs below the neck.

eowet-09

eowet-09

The shirt fabric is linen and the idea was to work white work on this. The markings were made according to the pattern, which was to be worked on both sides in the front. Crochet edging was worked later on the sleeve. This embroidery was a tough project, linen fabric did not help.

eowet-10

eowet-10

This yellow tunic is cotton. The pattern was transferred on to the front, where a marking was made for the neck. White and yellow carbons were ruled out on this colour. Green carbon paper was used to transfer the pattern. The marking is still on the neck to show the difference between the neck line on pattern and the actual neckline!

eowet-11

eowet-11

This mangalagiri cotton tunic has kantha embroidery on it. The tailor had marked a simple round neck. The pattern transfer and embroidery were worked on front and sleeves based on that. Seeing the work, he changed the neckline to this beautiful one. Sometimes it is better to leave some small space around the neck, to facilitate these kind of surprises. There is also a possibility of the tailor cutting off a small part of embroidery during his course of work.

eowet-12

eowet-12

The pattern for this kutchwork embroidery was drawn with this neck design. It was transferred on to the marked fabric. This tunic sample is a proof of a good coordination of pattern neckline and the tunic neckline.

eowet-13

eowet-13

The embroidery design for this cotton mangalagiri tunic was picked from a salwar design magazine. The tailor had this magazine with him. When I wanted to do this project, he not only marked but also explained where each and every element should be placed. Based on the inspiration and the guidance, this pattern was drawn and embroidered. Around the neck I had to draw the elements by hand to get the same effect. Still it was worth it. This embroidery has surface satin stitch on it.

eowet-14

eowet-14

Each and every design on these samples was chosen for that particular tunic in mind and they were all worked with the help of the markings made by the tailor.
We can work any embroidery on the tunic fabric in this manner. Important thing to note is to check whether the fabric is suitable for that embroidery. It is not just designing the embroidery, the tunic style is also kept in mind. It is a very interesting work. Practice, perseverance, eye for colours, basic calculations and understanding of fabrics and embroidery are the tools.
Enjoy designing and embroidering on wearable.

This embroidery around the neck of this cream and yellow printed cotton tunic was done in the fourth quarter of the year 2013.

creyelneckt-fab

creyelneckt-fab

The embroidery was on bright yellow cotton fabric, which was also the salwar fabric. The pattern had two parts, a medium size kutchwork border and a curved design. Both were worked with cotton skeins. I tried to bring an assissi effect, by working the background with herringbone filling and outlining with back stitch. The tunic-

cream&yellow neck tunic

cream&yellow neck tunic

The embroidery detail-

cream yellow neck tunic detail

cream yellow neck tunic detail

The pattern.

creyelneckt-pattern

creyelneckt-pattern

For the 16th week the progress on my projects are posted under this heading. It is helpful to the keep the mind focused on the progress of each one. The progress made by others can be seen on Pintangle.
The TAST challenge stitch took most of the time in this week. after completing it ,I moved on to the embroidery on tunic-
The centre of the yoke pattern on yellow tunic was worked with berry stitch [stranded cotton], chain stitch outlines [cotton skein and gold metallic thread] and herringbone filling [ variegated fine silk thread]

16.wipwednesdays-cytunic3

16.wipwednesdays-cytunic3

The back stitched petals and the progressing fly stitch filling inside the paisleys.

16.wipwednesdays-cytunic4

16.wipwednesdays-cytunic4

Embellishments will be with mirrors and beads. The third week edges were completed on Randje per week challenge. These edges are 8 inches in length. I started them in February.

16.wipwednesdays-rpw3

16.wipwednesdays-rpw3

The hussif was totally neglected this week too. The studio journal class lessons are very interesting and keeps me excited with many ideas, the habit of writing down the ideas needs to cultivated. Hoping that will start soon.

This tunic fabric had all the aspects I wanted- crepe material, black and red colours, traditional Indian pattern print all over. I couldn’t resist buying it.
The neck pattern for embroidery was also drawn in the same theme, traditional Indian design.

blackredcrepe-pattern

blackredcrepe-pattern

I chose black satin fabric for working this embroidery. It was hard taking a clear picture without the satin sheen. The embroidery was done with chain stitch, resembling aari work with zardosi beads and stones. It is easy to work Indian embroidery styles on traditional Indian designs.

blackred crepe-emb

blackred crepe-emb

The completed tunic-

black red crepe tunic

black red crepe tunic

Embroidery and embellishment detail-

blackred crepe-det

blackred crepe-det

I wear this tunic with black silk salwar. But It is so hot now, I feel I am melting, at the thought of wearing this outfit!

Next Page »