kasuti embroidery


The tunic fabric is mangalagiri cotton with maroon and  yellow stripes.

yelmarmirt-fabric

yelmarmirt-fabric

I came across a geometric border on a tunic in a shop. This was a printed border. I wanted use this design idea for embroidery on tunic. This inspired pattern had both mirror and kutch work elements.

yelmarmirt-pattern

yelmarmirt-pattern

Starting with metallic thread and small kutch elements.

yelmarmirt-1

yelmarmirt-1

Chain stitch outline in green thread.

yelmarmirt-2

yelmarmirt-2

The same green thread is used for continuous kutchwork design.

yelmarmirt-3

yelmarmirt-3

Medium square mirrors were stitched on this embroidered border.

yelmarmirt-4

yelmarmirt-4

It was hard to take a straight picture of this tunic, because of the mirrors.

yellow maroon mirrorwork tunic

yellow maroon mirrorwork tunic

The detail of the sewn tunic with embroidery.

yelmarmirt-det

yelmarmirt-det

This being a geometric design, it also was an inspiration for this black work border. I have not used this pattern.

yelmarmirt- blackwork pattern

yelmarmirt- blackwork pattern

The second black work border in dark brown thread was worked this week on the aida cloth. It is nearing completion on one side. This border is also worked continuously and completed in the return journey.

WIPW54-beigebwt-7

WIPW54-beigebwt-7

Small straight stitches were worked around the kutchwork motifs on the mirror work yoke.

WIPW54-blmirt-5

WIPW54-blmirt-5

Drawing kalamkari patterns is very interesting. Now I know why some people enjoy zentangles. The repetitive patterns are really relaxing. I listen to some sleep inducing music during this exercise. Working half an hour at night seems ideal now.

WIPW54-kalam-2

WIPW54-kalam-2

This week’s edges are quite interesting on this challenge. The free graph for these edges are here.

rpw2015-45

rpw2015-45

The interesting part starts with the 46th edge. This edge is worked in double running stitch or Holbein stitch. By working with this stitch, the edge looks the same on both right and wrong sides. The Indian kasuti embroidery is worked this way. Video demonstration of this technique is available on this link.

rpw2015-46

rpw2015-46

I was excited to start this on my own, missing the video. The method of working the ends neatly is shown there. So sad! My untidy version is here. But I have managed to work the cross stitch in double running stitch.

rpw2015-46 reverse

rpw2015-46 reverse

I have stopped worrying that the thread used on these edges is not bright. It feels okay now.

There is a variation on this week’s edges. The second edge is worked in Algerian eye stitch. The free graph for these edges are here.

rpw-2015-41,42

rpw-2015-41,42

When working this Algerian eye stitch, I remembered about kasuti embroidery. This embroidery which is worked mainly in double running stitch, is from Karnataka, India. There are many aspects, regarding the origin, region, types, stitches, names, uses of this embroidery.

This particular stitch is worked as a design in double running stitch, which results in the right and the reverse side of the embroidery being the same. I tried working this edge with this idea in mind. So, the wrong side of this edge which looks like a mirror image of the original one excluding the knots, of course! That problem has to be tackled when working on kasuti embroidery. it was quite interesting to work this edge.

rpw2015-42 reverse

rpw2015-42 reverse