This tunic fabric is cotton. It might be Kanchi or south Indian cotton. It came with a woven  border on it. The embroidery is worked after the tunic is sewn. The tailor stitched the border on the tunic beautifully and neatly.

pinborkut-before emb

pinborkut-before emb

The idea was to work kutchwork borders just below the borders in the front of tunic and use mirrors to further embellish it. Presently the designs I am working on are exclusively kutchwork, without any other stitches, influenced by Armenian Marash embroidery. The small kutchwork borders were drawn free hand with pencil. When I started embroidering on the tunics, this is how the designs were drawn on sewn tunics. Going down the memory lane, the kutchwork embroidery was worked with yellow anchor cotton skein# 304.

pinbotkut-left

pinbotkut-left

The second border is made of square kutchwork motifs. I was still in the stage of adding mirrors below this border. The detail-

pinborkut-rightdet

pinborkut-rightdet

The completed second border. When looking at these two borders, I felt the embroidered borders were quite attractive below the woven borders by themselves, and if the mirrors are stitched, they might take the focus away from the beauty of the woven border.

pinborkut-right

pinborkut-right

While buying this fabric, I could get a cotton ikat with similar colour scheme of the woven border for matching salwar [Indian pants].

pinborkut-salwar

pinborkut-salwar

The completed tunic.

pink border kutchwork tunic

pink border kutchwork tunic

Since the patterns were drawn on the tunic itself, the pattern on paper is not available for sharing.

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