These are samples to further explore embroidery borders worked on separate cloth, and are later attached to the tunics.

eonwb-5

eonwb-5

In this ikat mercerized cotton tunic, Black work embroidery border is worked on aida cloth. This easy in the sense, the pattern tracing is totally avoided. Cross stitch, black work, kasuti , chicken scratch embroideries can be worked on aida, matti or any other fabric with checks, dots. Measure the length of the border required and start the embroidery.

eonwb-6a

eonwb-6a

These are mirrorwork/ phulkari borders done on dark blue fabric. These are for sleeves. note the extra space on either sides for the seam allowance.

eonwb-6b

eonwb-6b

The same embroidered border along with a small motif attached to a Bengal cotton tunic. I did not attempt the neck because the tunic fabric is fine count cotton, the mirrors and embroidery might have weighed down the neck.

eonwb-7

eonwb-7

The tunic fabric is cotton ikat. The same black work border notion is elaborated here. The length of the tunic below the neck, the sleeves, two panels on the sides were measured. The black work pattern was drawn on black mangalagiri cotton fabric. And the embroidery was done with threads and some silver beads. The pattern tracing was in full swing for this tunic!

eonwb-8

eonwb-8

This tunic is a recycled tunic. Meaning, the embroidery on the green fabric was done on another tunic, which became too tight. So these borders were attached to this violet mangalagiri tunic.
This is the first level in embroidering on wearable. The focus is on colour coordination, pattern choices and the embroidery itself. And this is an attempt to give an idea to start .These borders are faster to work, and chances of making mistakes are minimal and they are also easily rectifiable. It is better to start with small borders.

Once we are comfortable working this we can move on to drawing the neckline on paper.

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