This is the last past of the series in hand embroidery on wearable. In this post we’ll consider some ideas of designing embroidery on tunics which are marked for necklines and sleeves. By this method it is possible to work any type of embroidery of our choice on wearable. Ready to wear tunics are made this way on large scale.
The fabrics are marked for necklines, sleeves, slits, shoulders, borders. The chosen embroidery designs are transferred on to the fabrics. These fabrics are secured on big rectangular embroidery frames. The embroidery is done by embroiderers trained for this. After the embroidery is completed, the fabrics are taken away from the frames and sewn by tailors.
But we can do it on a small scale. After choosing the embroidery design, we can ask the tailor [or if a person is good tailor, then help themselves] to mark the places on the fabric to work the embroidery. Using these markings as guidelines, we can transfer the pattern on the fabrics. After completing the embroidery, the fabrics can be sewn into tunics, blouses, shirts… as the case may be.
Here are few samples of embroidered tunics, which were marked, embroidered and sewn into tunics.
This mangalagiri cotton tunic with stripes was marked with neckline. This was in early days when I was trying this idea. Though it was marked, the pattern chosen for this kutchwork embroidery was set apart from the actual neck line. After embroidering on the pattern, I added some small kutchwork motifs below the neck.

eowet-09

eowet-09

The shirt fabric is linen and the idea was to work white work on this. The markings were made according to the pattern, which was to be worked on both sides in the front. Crochet edging was worked later on the sleeve. This embroidery was a tough project, linen fabric did not help.

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eowet-10

This yellow tunic is cotton. The pattern was transferred on to the front, where a marking was made for the neck. White and yellow carbons were ruled out on this colour. Green carbon paper was used to transfer the pattern. The marking is still on the neck to show the difference between the neck line on pattern and the actual neckline!

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eowet-11

This mangalagiri cotton tunic has kantha embroidery on it. The tailor had marked a simple round neck. The pattern transfer and embroidery were worked on front and sleeves based on that. Seeing the work, he changed the neckline to this beautiful one. Sometimes it is better to leave some small space around the neck, to facilitate these kind of surprises. There is also a possibility of the tailor cutting off a small part of embroidery during his course of work.

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eowet-12

The pattern for this kutchwork embroidery was drawn with this neck design. It was transferred on to the marked fabric. This tunic sample is a proof of a good coordination of pattern neckline and the tunic neckline.

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eowet-13

The embroidery design for this cotton mangalagiri tunic was picked from a salwar design magazine. The tailor had this magazine with him. When I wanted to do this project, he not only marked but also explained where each and every element should be placed. Based on the inspiration and the guidance, this pattern was drawn and embroidered. Around the neck I had to draw the elements by hand to get the same effect. Still it was worth it. This embroidery has surface satin stitch on it.

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eowet-14

Each and every design on these samples was chosen for that particular tunic in mind and they were all worked with the help of the markings made by the tailor.
We can work any embroidery on the tunic fabric in this manner. Important thing to note is to check whether the fabric is suitable for that embroidery. It is not just designing the embroidery, the tunic style is also kept in mind. It is a very interesting work. Practice, perseverance, eye for colours, basic calculations and understanding of fabrics and embroidery are the tools.
Enjoy designing and embroidering on wearable.

This week’s edges are simple on randje per week 2015 challenge. The free graph is available here.

RPW2015-53,54

RPW2015-53,54

 

The second black work border in dark brown thread was worked this week on the aida cloth. It is nearing completion on one side. This border is also worked continuously and completed in the return journey.

WIPW54-beigebwt-7

WIPW54-beigebwt-7

Small straight stitches were worked around the kutchwork motifs on the mirror work yoke.

WIPW54-blmirt-5

WIPW54-blmirt-5

Drawing kalamkari patterns is very interesting. Now I know why some people enjoy zentangles. The repetitive patterns are really relaxing. I listen to some sleep inducing music during this exercise. Working half an hour at night seems ideal now.

WIPW54-kalam-2

WIPW54-kalam-2

We have two lovely medium size edges this week on Randje per week 2015 cross stitch challenge. The free graphs for these edges are here.

RPW2015-51,52

RPW2015-51,52

The black work border on the other side was completed on the beige black work panel. Another border has to be started. This border also will be worked on both sides. Though it is taking more time than I expected, it is exciting to work this double running stitch. The stitch is continuously worked and is completed on the return journey. Interestingly one edge on randje per week challenge is a similar Algerian eye border pattern this week. But it is worked in two colours.

WIPW53-beigebwt-6

WIPW53-beigebwt-6

On the mirror work yoke, the mirrors are to be outlined with green thread. The other triangles are worked in orange thread, still not too sure that this orange is a good choice. But decided to go ahead with it. This is another multi coloured yoke!

WIPW53-blmirt-4

WIPW53-blmirt-4

After procrastinating for some time, I have decided to start the kalamkari drawing practice. After drawing these borders in 0.5 pencil, they are reinforced with 0.5 pen. The practice is done with the help of the images from the internet. I am choosing elements from the images to learn this art. Still a long way to go, but just happy to stay on track.

WIPW53-kalam-1

WIPW53-kalam-1

In this part of the series we will see the possibilities of working embroidery on sewn tunics. We all have some plain tunics either sewn by a tailor or bought from the shop. These tunics inspire us to work some simple embroidery to enhance the look. Big shops have same tunics in different sizes, how to make them unique? is the question. Sometimes printed salwars or patialas or leggings, jeans help us to jazz up a plain tunic. The necklines, the sleeves and the style are already there. The first thing to choose is the embroidery itself. The options are- our embroidery skill and use of mirrors or beads or stones. There are embellished pieces available in the market. These pieces can be glued or sewn or appliqued on to the tunic fabric. Now moving on to the colour choices. Generally colours are chosen with tunic in mind or are based on the salwar or leggings. Sometimes a colour in our mind also brings about a project. Tracing the design. This is the trickiest part in embroidering on sewn tunics. A well sewn tunic may look odd with wrongly placed design. It is hard to erase the mistakes of the copied design. Ensure the design is placed at the right place before tracing. Some tips- Please work at one sitting, instead of moving away for some other purpose. Use a steady hand. Stabilize the pattern with pins. Lift and check at different points before tracing. If there are pleats, seams on the tunics, ensure the pattern papers placed properly and careful in drawing over and around them. These are the vulnerable places, where if the pressure applied is more it may cause tearing of the pattern. Place the tunic on a flat surface. Spread it well. Be careful while securing with pins. Pierce with the pin the paper and the tunic together. Smoothen the surface of creases after the pins are all in place. Check often to see the placement is as perfect as possible. This part is not to be done when we are tired. Tracing any pattern on to the fabric is tedious. There is another option. When we want to stitch mirrors, beads on to the fabric, we can mark the points with the help of scale. Small lines and curves can be drawn with the help of pencil and scale if we have a steady hand. Now let see some samples of embroidery on sewn tunics. This tunic has a kutchwork motif element which is repeated to make a border. The single motif element is extended a little and used for the centre. The border was traced without much difficulty with the use of .the lines on this checked cotton mangalagiri tunic. The centre was folded and midpoint of the design was placed on it before securing with pins.

eowet-1

eowet-1

This tunic fabric is Kanchi cotton. The border on the fabric was horizontally sewn in front. The centre was folded and the midpoint of this kutchwork design was placed over it before it was traced. The border was too plain, some line stitches are worked on them and around the neck.

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eowet-2

This design with the square especially for this neck was traced in the centre on this cotton tunic.

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eowet-3

The tunic fabric is tussar. It was sewn with lining. The embroidery was worked with single strand of anchor cotton. To fill inside the design space with running stitches, the lines on the fabric were used.

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eowet-4

Here are some samples were the markings are made with the help of ruler. In this border, points are marked with the help of pencil and ruler. Fly stitch variation is worked on those marked points in black thread. Mirrors and beads can be worked in this manner.

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eowet-5

This cotton tunic  in maroon colour was sewn with these borders in the front. The sleeves were made in cotton ikat fabric. After copying the motif below these borders, the markings for the mirrors, kutchwork squares were made with the help of ruler. The individual kutchwork elements were drawn by hand.

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eowet-6

In this tunic, the sleeves, the border and the fabric below the neck were all sewn by the tailor. The paisleys on the printed yoke was highlighted with white thread. The space around the fabric was quite thick, it would have been hard to work the embroidery on it. Using the outline, the kutchwork elements were drawn at equal intervals around it. Gold sequins and beads were added as embellishments.

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eowet-7

This linen tunic was sewn with tiny pleats in front. Markings were made with the ruler for the flowers, the stems were drawn around it.

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eowet-8

It was difficult to use the embroidery hoop on these four tunics, so I did not use it. These samples are shown here to explain some ideas on embroidery on tunics. The samples used are my own. Use this as a reference and move ahead and work to create your own beautiful tunics. The last post on this series will be embroidery on tunic part two, where the tailor cooperates and marks the neck, sleeves for embroidery.

The 25th week’s edges are very interesting to work. The main thread I have chosen for working on the edges these past weeks is variegated and is not giving enough contrast to the fabric colour. But this 49th edge brings out the full impact of the thread colours.

RPW2015-49

RPW2015-49

This edge looks very unique and beautiful with the use of two threads. The idea of using the colours together in sequence on these Algerian eyelet stitches was very exciting and I love this edge.

RPW2015-50

RPW2015-50

The free graph for these edges are here.

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